Difference between revisions of "Abādhita"

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Abādhita is literally translated as ‘not contradicted’.  
 
Abādhita is literally translated as ‘not contradicted’.  
  
The word bādha and its derivatives are often used as technical terms, in the sense of objection or contradiction. Hence ‘abādhita’ means that which is not contradicted, ‘[[a]]’ being the negative quotient. In truth or reality, one which is abādhita can never be contradicted. So what is contradicted can never be considered true or real in the ultimate sense.
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The word [[bādha]] and its derivatives are often used as technical terms, in the sense of objection or contradiction. Hence ‘abādhita’ means that which is not contradicted, ‘[[a]]’ being the negative quotient. In truth or reality, one which is abādhita can never be contradicted. So what is contradicted can never be considered true or real in the ultimate sense.
  
  
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{{Reflist}}
 
{{Reflist}}
 
* The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram [[Krishna]] Math, Bangalore
 
* The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram [[Krishna]] Math, Bangalore
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[[Category:Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism]]
  
 
[[Category:Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism]]
 
[[Category:Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism]]

Latest revision as of 07:46, 6 December 2015

By Swami Harshananda

Sometimes transliterated as: Abadhita, AbAdhita, Abaadhita


Abādhita is literally translated as ‘not contradicted’.

The word bādha and its derivatives are often used as technical terms, in the sense of objection or contradiction. Hence ‘abādhita’ means that which is not contradicted, ‘a’ being the negative quotient. In truth or reality, one which is abādhita can never be contradicted. So what is contradicted can never be considered true or real in the ultimate sense.


References

  • The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore