Difference between revisions of "Adhyātma-prasāda"

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Mind is the basic instrument for gaining knowledge and wisdom. Controlling its vagaries and making it flow in [[a]] concentrated manner is the best means of attaining knowledge in any field.  
 
Mind is the basic instrument for gaining knowledge and wisdom. Controlling its vagaries and making it flow in [[a]] concentrated manner is the best means of attaining knowledge in any field.  
  
By a long and arduous process of yogic discipline that includes the practice of ethical principles like ahimsā (non-violence), satya (truth) and brahmacarya (continence) and the practice of concentration by stages, the mind loses all its dross and impurities and becomes placid and pellucid. Such a state of mind is called ‘[[adhyātma]]-prasāda’.<ref>Yogasutras 1.47</ref>  
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By a long and arduous process of yogic discipline that includes the practice of ethical principles like ahimsā (non-violence), satya (truth) and [[brahmacarya]] (continence) and the practice of concentration by stages, the mind loses all its dross and impurities and becomes placid and pellucid. Such a state of mind is called ‘[[adhyātma]]-prasāda’.<ref>Yogasutras 1.47</ref>  
  
 
This state of the mind, being rid of all impurities that distract and disturb it, has become like a pure crystal capable of reflecting the [[consciousness]] of the puruṣ[[a]] (the Self), in full measure. Such a mind can produce instant knowledge of any object towards which it is directed.
 
This state of the mind, being rid of all impurities that distract and disturb it, has become like a pure crystal capable of reflecting the [[consciousness]] of the puruṣ[[a]] (the Self), in full measure. Such a mind can produce instant knowledge of any object towards which it is directed.

Latest revision as of 06:05, 15 December 2016

By Swami Harshananda

Sometimes transliterated as: Adhyatma-prasada, AdhyAtma-prasAda, Adhyaatma-prasaada


Adhyātma-prasāda literally means ‘peace of the mind within’.

Mind is the basic instrument for gaining knowledge and wisdom. Controlling its vagaries and making it flow in a concentrated manner is the best means of attaining knowledge in any field.

By a long and arduous process of yogic discipline that includes the practice of ethical principles like ahimsā (non-violence), satya (truth) and brahmacarya (continence) and the practice of concentration by stages, the mind loses all its dross and impurities and becomes placid and pellucid. Such a state of mind is called ‘adhyātma-prasāda’.[1]

This state of the mind, being rid of all impurities that distract and disturb it, has become like a pure crystal capable of reflecting the consciousness of the puruṣa (the Self), in full measure. Such a mind can produce instant knowledge of any object towards which it is directed.

References

  1. Yogasutras 1.47
  • The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore