Difference between revisions of "Drupada"

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# firm footed  
 
# firm footed  
 
# pillar; coloum; monument  
 
# pillar; coloum; monument  
# the king of the Pāñcālas, who was the son of Pŗşata, and the father of [[Dhŗşţadyumna]], Śikhandi, and Draupadī, and the father-in-law of the five Pāndavas through their marriage to Draupadī. He was [[a]] childhood friend of [[Droņa]], who had insulted and refused to acknowlewdged the latter when he grew up became king, which resulted in abitter enemity between them, starting [[a]] cycle of revenge-and-retribution that ultimately led to Drupada’s death at the hands of Droņa in the [[Bharata]] War, followed by [[Droņa]]’s slaying by Dhŗşţadyumna, and ultimately the slaying of Dhŗşţadyumna, Śikhandi andf the five sons of Draupadī by Droņa’s son Aśvatthāmā in a nighttime stealth attack the day after the war ended.   
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# the king of the Pāñcālas, who was the son of Pŗşata, and the father of [[Dhŗşţadyumna]], Śikhandi, and [[Draupadī]], and the father-in-law of the five Pāndavas through their marriage to [[Draupadī]]. He was [[a]] childhood friend of [[Droņa]], who had insulted and refused to acknowlewdged the latter when he grew up became king, which resulted in abitter enemity between them, starting [[a]] cycle of revenge-and-retribution that ultimately led to Drupada’s death at the hands of [[Droņa]] in the [[Bharata]] War, followed by [[Droņa]]’s slaying by [[Dhŗşţadyumna]], and ultimately the slaying of [[Dhŗşţadyumna]], Śikhandi andf the five sons of Draupadī by [[Droņa]]’s son [[Aśvatthāmā]] in a nighttime stealth attack the day after the war ended.   
  
 
[[Category:Glossary]]
 
[[Category:Glossary]]

Latest revision as of 09:13, 16 December 2016

By Jit Majumdar


  1. firm footed
  2. pillar; coloum; monument
  3. the king of the Pāñcālas, who was the son of Pŗşata, and the father of Dhŗşţadyumna, Śikhandi, and Draupadī, and the father-in-law of the five Pāndavas through their marriage to Draupadī. He was a childhood friend of Droņa, who had insulted and refused to acknowlewdged the latter when he grew up became king, which resulted in abitter enemity between them, starting a cycle of revenge-and-retribution that ultimately led to Drupada’s death at the hands of Droņa in the Bharata War, followed by Droņa’s slaying by Dhŗşţadyumna, and ultimately the slaying of Dhŗşţadyumna, Śikhandi andf the five sons of Draupadī by Droņa’s son Aśvatthāmā in a nighttime stealth attack the day after the war ended.