Difference between revisions of "Vanara"

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Vanara in [[Sanskrit]] can mean one of three things
 
Vanara in [[Sanskrit]] can mean one of three things
# <i>vana nara</i> meaning humans living in forests
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# <i>vana [[nara]]</i> meaning humans living in forests
# <i>va-nara</i> meaning humans with monkey like tails.
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# <i>va-[[nara]]</i> meaning humans with monkey like tails.
 
# <i>vaa-nara</i> also means nara-like or human-like. Thus it is the animal that is man-like, or an ape.  
 
# <i>vaa-nara</i> also means nara-like or human-like. Thus it is the animal that is man-like, or an ape.  
  
Vanaras are often referred to as monkeys and the common portrayal of Vanaras in TV show them as such.  In Sanskrit, however, monkeys are <i>vana kapi</i> or simply <i>kapi</i> or <i>markata</i>.
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Vanaras are often referred to as monkeys and the common portrayal of Vanaras in TV show them as such.  In [[Sanskrit]], however, monkeys are <i>vana kapi</i> or simply <i>kapi</i> or <i>markata</i>.

Latest revision as of 03:56, 19 December 2016

Vanar are mentioned in the Ramayana. Lord Rama took an army of vanars with him when he attacked Ravana's Lanka.

Vanara in Sanskrit can mean one of three things

  1. vana nara meaning humans living in forests
  2. va-nara meaning humans with monkey like tails.
  3. vaa-nara also means nara-like or human-like. Thus it is the animal that is man-like, or an ape.

Vanaras are often referred to as monkeys and the common portrayal of Vanaras in TV show them as such. In Sanskrit, however, monkeys are vana kapi or simply kapi or markata.